Tipu Sultan's richly decorated mobile tent - one of spoils of Angelo-Mysore war acquired by Edward Clive, Gov. of Madras!!

Tipu Sultan's tent (tapestry)toshkhana.wordpress.com

Above image : Tipu Sultan’s tent, India. It  was part of an exhibition“ 2015. The Fabric of India” at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London.  The Victoria and Albert Museum has the largest collection of Indian textiles in the world — more than 10,000 pieces, from the simplest weaves that dressed poor farmers to lavish embroidered silks worn by Mughal emperors and maharajas. Yet the museum has never before staged an exhibition devoted to this rich subject. Possibly the tent in which Lord Cornwallis and his entourage were formally received by Tipu Sahib with his  sons on 24 February 1792, following the Treaty of Mysore; acquired by 1st Early of Powis and brought to Powis Castle circa 1800.  Credit...The National Trust, Powis Castle, Wales; photograph by Erik Pelham.....................

ceiling, Tipu sultan's tent. acquired by Edward Clive.notesonindianhistory.com

Tipu sultan's travelling tent notesonindianhistory.com

What is unique about this rare tent is in contrast to the plain-coloured fabric of the exterior, the interior is highly decorative, consisting of panels with repeated acanthus-cusped niches, with vases of symmetrical flower heads and stems,  creating an illusion of paneled niches in a palace. It is made from four separate sections. Many such historical specimens of this kind  have not survived. This tent akin to moving palace was handcrafted between 1725 to 1750. from printed cotton chintz. The color is not faded yet despite its age.

Ancient India was the cradle of cotton fabric and it is intertwined  with Indian civilization for thousands of years In the 15th to 19th century Indian cotton fabrics  were highly sought after across the world in particular status conscious British and French aristocracy. Indian printed color fabrics were also available for the commoners in Europe. Durability, catching designs of flowers, animals, etc,,suitability to all weather conditions, non-fading qualities were the hallmark of ag-old Indian fabric industries. It was labor intensive and the process was a time-consuming one.  It was the first country to spin cotton  into thread and woven into cloth roughly 800o years ago. Even to day 10 percent of the cloth produced here is woven on hand looms by families of weavers who have been in this traditional trade for centuries. This 

cottage industry being encouraged by the state and central governments account for over 4 million people whose livelihood is dependent on the manufacturing sector.

Tipu Sultan of Mysore, S.India. upload.wikimedia.org

Above image: Portrait of Tipu Sultan by an anonymous Indian artist in Mysore, ca. 1790–1800. From Kate Brittle bank's, Tipu Sultan's Search for Legitimacy, New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 1997.....

What is special about this printed Tipu Sultan's tent? Steeped in history, it was once used by none other than Tiger of Mysore, Tipu Sultan who terrorized the English company with his valor, wisdom and his military invention Mysorian rockets- ingeniously designed rockets  with heat resistant tube  that could travel a mile or so and when hitting the ground could produce devastating effects. This tent is a symbol  royalty and showcases how Indian  travelled with their entourage  while on war expedition or hunting expedition or casual journey across the land.  The decorated tents were  sort of mini apartments, not devoid of palace ambiance. They were potable and could be jerryriged as a mini palace.

Powis castles, Wales, with collections,Alkamy.com

 powis castle and garden  wallpaperflare.com

Aove images, Powis castle in Wales  owned by Robert clive 's descendants. It has a large collection of loots from various parts of india and other countries. Tipu Sultan's tent is one among them.........

Gov. of Madras Edward Clive (1754–1839),
                                                                   en.wikipedia.org,

Above image:  William Hoare (1707-1792) (after) - The Honourable Edward Clive (1754–1839), Later 1st Earl of Powis of the Third Creation - 1180935 - National Trust.  He was the eldest son of Robert Clive, 1st Baron Clive ("Clive of India"), and Margaret born Maskelyne.............................

.His death during the siege of Seringapatam of 1799 was followed by the seizure of the spoils of war, particularly those associated with Tīpū. This tent and many other objects, including Tīpū’s travelling bed and parts of his throne, were obtained by Edward Clive, first earl of Powis (1754–1839), while he was governor of Madras (1798–1803) and subsequently became known as The Clive Collection.

Though dejected, following his defeat and the Treaty of Mysore in 1792, Tipu never lost his spirit and continued to blokade the expansion of the British south of his kingdom.

His death during the siege of Seringapatam of 1799 in the final Anglo-Mysore War was followed by looting of  the spoils of war, particularly those associated with Tīpū. It included numerous items including his personal goldeen ring with the Hindu god's name RAM inscribed on it.  This tent and many other objects, including Tīpū’s travelling bed and parts of his throne, were obtained by Edward Clive, first Earl of Powis (1754–1839), while he was governor of Madras (1798–1803) and subsequently became known as The Clive Collection.

https://www.nationaltrustcollections.org.uk/object/1180731.1

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